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Summer 2021, Fall 2019

Greece’s Secret to Perfect Honey

While the United States and other prosperous countries have struggled to keep their honeybees alive, Greece—a country suffering from a decade of intense economic troubles—continues to produce what many consider the world’s finest honey. What’s the Greeks’ secret? And why can’t honey producers in wealthier countries keep up?

By ROB WATERS

Spring 2021, Winter 2016

The Kitchen Bladesmith

When Bob Kramer decided it was time to make his own cutlery, he had no idea that his career turn would take him deep into the secret lives of knives. Now he’s established a reputation as one of the most revered bladesmiths in the world—playing David to the Goliath cutlery manufacturers of Germany and Japan.

Story by TODD OPPENHEIMER
Photography by MICHAEL MATISSE and MARTY NAKAYAMA

Spring 2018, Winter 2021

A Home-Grown Social Entrepreneur

Since 2010, Kelly Carlisle has been breaking new ground—literally— for youngsters in East Oakland and beyond, using an urban farm to inspire them to engage with the world as curious citizens. “Part of my work,” she says, “is to make sure we expand their worldview.”

By WILL CALLAN

Winter 2021

Soul Food Gets the Vegan Treatment

Driven primarily by health, Black vegan restaurateurs are creating plant-based versions of soul food that avoid meat, salty fats, and other bodily evildoers, while still retaining the succulence and rich memories of those beloved old family recipes. And in some cases, the turn to the vegan lifestyle is also turning some lives around.

By TERRY COLLINS

Spring 2020

Tips and Inspiration from England’s Great Dixter Gardens

Fergus Garrett, one of the world’s preeminent gardening experts, talks about the art of making fine gardens, and fine gardeners. His tips are drawn from his years managing Great Dixter House & Gardens, the famously gorgeous and uncommonly diverse set of gardens that lie just outside London.

By THOMAS C. COOPER

Spring 2020

Artisanal Homemade Bread Made Simple

Confined to our homes during the Covid-19 quarantine, many of us have realized this is an ideal time to start baking our own bread. The idea has spread so fast that stores are running out of flour and yeast. But fear not. Resources abound for how to make your own yeast, and even your own flour.

By TODD OPPENHEIMER
Photos by ERIC WOLFINGER

Fall 2019

Could Small Still Be Beautiful?

For a brief time in the mid-1970s, a British economist named E.F. Schumacher changed the conversation across the Western world with a daring book entitled “Small Is Beautiful.” Schumacher argued that the push for endless growth was destroying the foundations of meaningful work, and it was doomed to fail. Although Schumacher died before he could develop his ideas, a center founded in his name has tried to continue his legacy. Might his message be even more timely today?

By BRYCE T. BAUER

Fall 2019

2019 Craftsmanship Quarterly Gift Guide

The word artisanal has become so shopworn that it’s almost devoid of meaning. (To wit: we once saw a pizza outlet on the outskirts of a small town in northern France that was fashioned in the style of an ATM-kiosk under the following sign: “Artisanal Pizza.”) In stark contrast to this sorry state of affairs, we would like to suggest a few items for holiday shopping made by some of the masters we profiled in 2019.

By EDITORS OF CRAFTSMANSHIP QUARTERLY

Summer 2019

Café Jacqueline and the Art of the Soufflè

Deep in San Francisco’s storied North Beach neighborhood, Jacqueline Margulis has been making soufflès for her café’s customers five nights a week for nearly 40 years. Our story—and mini-documentary—on the only restaurant in the U.S. that specializes solely on this challenging but famously scrumptious symbol of French cuisine.

Film by PHOEBE RUBIN
Story by TODD OPPENHEIMER

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