The New Water Alchemists
Winter 2017

The New Water Alchemists

A growing number of researchers and pastoralists around the globe have found remarkable, untapped opportunities in nature’s water cycle. It turns out that animals, plants, soil, and air have long collaborated to regulate our climate through water—until we disrupted their partnership. An environmental author sees a pathway to reconciliation.

BY Judith D. Schwartz
A Tale of Two Vermouths
Winter 2017

A Tale of Two Vermouths

In a small town outside Torino, Italy, the age-old Vermouth giant, Martini & Rossi has turned this beverage into a model of what might be called industrial spirits craftsmanship. Our correspondent goes visiting, then returns stateside to watch a small one-man shop create the modern artisanal version. What are differences, and why do they matter?

BY Laura Fraser
The hydraulic genius of Shari’ah law
Winter 2017

The hydraulic genius of Shari’ah law

You have probably never heard of the term “acequia,” but it describes one of oldest, most common sense systems of irrigation on the planet. The basic idea is to use, and share, a river’s natural patterns instead of the predominant American system—namely, trap it, pipe it, and race to be the first to use it. Our writer tours the globe to track down its history, and its leading practitioners.

BY Roberto Lovato
Our second annual Artisanal Gift Guide
Winter 2017

Our second annual Artisanal Gift Guide

The word artisanal has become so shopworn that it’s almost devoid of meaning. (In fact, we once saw an outlet for fast pizza on the outskirts of a small town in northern France, which was fashioned in the style of an ATM-kiosk under the following sign: “Artisanal Pizza.”) In stark contrast to this sorry state of affairs, we would like to suggest a few items for holiday shopping made by some of the masters we profiled in 2016.

BY Sharon Tilley
The California Mirage
Winter 2017

The California Mirage

The blind spots in the American West’s water systems are in full display in Ventura County, a coastal region of southern California that happens to hold the most lucrative farmland in the state. Equally abundant, and somewhat in progress, are opportunities for enlightenment. Which path will prevail?

BY Crawford Coates
Slow Wine
Fall 2016

Slow Wine

There are many prized vintages from Valpolicella, a postcard-perfect town near Verona, Italy, known for its rich, slightly sweet wines. Over the years, however, as many of these wines have gotten only sweeter, one vineyard, Bertani, has remained true to the old traditions. The result: a complex, unusually balanced wine called Amarone. Our wine correspondent sets out in search of its secret.

BY Timothy Teichgraeber
Japan’s gorgeous, precarious fishing poles
Summer 2016

Japan’s gorgeous, precarious fishing poles

While Japanese master craftsmen command up to $100,000 for making a traditional bamboo fishing pole, aspiring younger makers can barely find anyone to train them. The difficulties plaguing this old art form open a window into Japan’s disappearing culture of craftsmanship. How this could happen in a land that has long served as the world’s model of hand-made perfection? Our correspondent goes fishing for the answer.

BY Yukari Iwatani Kane
My day with the Duchess
Summer 2016

My day with the Duchess

The man was having the day of his life—out fishing Idaho’s gorgeous Snake River, accompanied by his gorgeous wife (“The Duchess of Cascading Water”), and a whopper of a rainbow trout teasing him in the depths of a riffle off the far bank. Then suddenly, his day took a very painful turn.

BY Hope Strong
The secrets of an Italian gelato master
Summer 2016

The secrets of an Italian gelato master

Gelato, it turns out, is a very different creature from ice cream. And there is a reason that the best gelato tastes so creamy yet still light, so balanced, so indescribably perfect. The secret—according to master gelatieri Andrea Soban of Valenza, Italy—involves patience, exceptional ingredients, and a fine-tuned knowledge of food chemistry.

BY Erla Zwingle
How Far Can Beer Science Go?
Spring 2016

How Far Can Beer Science Go?

Where else would you expect to find a band of techno-scientific beer geeks except in the industrial side of San Francisco, Ground Zero for start-ups? Join our fermentation correspondent as she travels to the outer edges of beer flavors with the boys of Method Beer.

BY Grace Rubenstein
The Kitchen Bladesmith
Winter 2016

The Kitchen Bladesmith

When Bob Kramer decided it was time to make his own cutlery, he had no idea that his career turn would take him deep into the secret lives of knives. Now he’s established a reputation as one of the most revered bladesmiths in the world–playing David to the Goliath cutlery manufacturers of Germany and Japan.

BY Todd Oppenheimer
Can a Colonial Crafts Town Survive Modern Mexico?
Winter 2016

Can a Colonial Crafts Town Survive Modern Mexico?

In the 1500s, a Spanish bishop turned a collection of pueblos around the Mexican town of Patzcuaro into a center for craftsmanship. The people here are still making and marketing their wares in much the same way they did hundreds of years ago. Now they have to overcome tourists’ fears about drug traffickers, real or not.

BY Laura Fraser
An Artisanal Gift Guide
Winter 2016

An Artisanal Gift Guide

Welcome to Craftsmanship’s inaugural gift guide, where we list the best (or at least the most unusual) items that we could find during our first year exploring the artisan world. Our discoveries include fine kitchen knives, cooking pottery, guitars, harmonicas, alcoholic drinks, and, of course, some real children’s toys.

BY John Marcom
The King of Cake
Fall 2015

The King of Cake

Speaking of Venetian artisans, meet Nono Colussi–a man dedicated to creating the perfect cake

BY Owen Edwards
Mezcal’s Dance with Extinction
Fall 2015

Mezcal’s Dance with Extinction

By its very nature, mezcal—the precursor and parent to Mexico’s legendary tequila—is an endangered beverage. It must be made from wild agave, which is in increasingly short supply. But a determined mezcal scientist thinks he has an answer.

BY Grace Rubenstein
Rum’s Revenge
Fall 2015

Rum’s Revenge

In Brooklyn, a former nuclear engineer borrows from the Caribbean’s traditional methods of distilling rum, reviving America’s first spirit in the process.

BY Bryce T. Bauer
The Revival of Nero’s Wine
Fall 2015

The Revival of Nero’s Wine

Throughout history vintners used clay vessels to age their wine—until the French discovered the marvels of the oak barrel. Now—for fun, for distinctly different flavors, and to save some fine old trees—a few wineries are giving clay a second chance, Roman style.

BY Timothy Teichgraeber
The Vegetable Detective
Summer 2015

The Vegetable Detective

A molecular biologist is finding what could be dangerous levels of heavy metals in plants like kale, often called the “queen” of the vegetable kingdom. And they’ve shown up the most in organic varieties.

BY Todd Oppenheimer
The Clay Conjurer
Spring 2015

The Clay Conjurer

Felipe Ortega has devoted his life to creating the perfect pot of beans—and an unusually audacious way of looking at culture. Over the years, Ortega’s journey involved such an unusual combination of the traditional and the non-traditional that it puts a very old question into very new light: What’s the right way to look at cultural progress? Should we put a fence around our unique traditions? Or should we share them, welcoming the opportunity to mix with new ideas?

BY Deborah Busemeyer
Food Shift
Spring 2015

Food Shift

In an era of chronic drought, could desert crops become the new sustainable dinner?

BY Christopher Cook
Spoonism
Spring 2015

Spoonism

How I stumbled upon the world’s most perfect eating utensil.

BY Owen Edwards
The Clay Mystique
Spring 2015

The Clay Mystique

A gastro-scientific investigation of why cooks believe food tastes better (note: much better) when it’s cooked in a ceramic pot. Tour guide: Paula Wolfert, the legendary queen of American clay-pot cooking.

BY Todd Oppenheimer
Food by the Gallon
Spring 2015

Food by the Gallon

You drink eight glasses of water a day. But you consume far more through the food you eat. A special report.

BY Jessica Carew Kraft
The Drought Fighter
Winter 2015

The Drought Fighter

On a frigid, eight-acre farm just outside downtown Sebastopol, Paul Kaiser has devised a hyper-intensive form of organic agriculture that is grossing more than $100,000 an acre. And, he believes, saving the planet at the same time. Yet a number of farming experts see trouble on his horizon.

BY Todd Oppenheimer
Your Salad’s Difficulty with Sustainable Farming
Winter 2015

Your Salad’s Difficulty with Sustainable Farming

No matter how organic your shopping is, when you sit down to a plate of leafy greens, chances are you are supporting farming methods that contribute to global warming. There are, however, other options.

BY Todd Oppenheimer
The Many Stripes of Sustainable Agriculture
Winter 2015

The Many Stripes of Sustainable Agriculture

Was Jared Diamond right to call agriculture the worst mistake of the human race? Industrial agriculture vastly expanded the world’s food supply, but it’s also based on a fossil fuel economy that is slowly running out of juice. Are the alternatives like this “permaculture” operation in Wisconsin ready for prime time? Photo courtesy of newforestfarm.net

BY Jessica Carew Kraft
The Lost Prophet of California Agriculture
Winter 2015

The Lost Prophet of California Agriculture

Al Ruozi, age 97, is a high-school dropout whose primary invention was a machine, largely forgotten by now, that can help farmers save water, improve soil quality, and fight climate change.

BY Charlie Siler
The Carbon Gatherer
Winter 2015

The Carbon Gatherer

The carbon trading market is heating up again, and a lot of people who have been figuring out ways to grab carbon dioxide out of the air are back in the game. California’s John Wick may well be at the head of the pack.

BY Charlie Siler
A Brand New Idea for Commodity Exports
Winter 2015

A Brand New Idea for Commodity Exports

For years, a handful of enterprising grain farmers in the Midwest have been making huge strides–ecologically as well as financially–by managing to farm without plows and other invasive “tilling” machinery. Their achievements point to the possibility of a very different balance in global commodity trading markets.

BY Todd Oppenheimer
The Bug Whisperer
Winter 2015

The Bug Whisperer

Mark Sturges doesn’t advertise and clients have to find him by word of mouth, but find him they do. He’s become a master of an agricultural art as old as agriculture itself: basic compost.

BY Kristin Ohlson
Cuba’s Harvest of Surprises
Winter 2015

Cuba’s Harvest of Surprises

This time, a revolution that had nothing to do with ideology, and it bore a bounty of fruit. Could the U.S. learn sustainability from its new friend?

BY Christopher Cook
Smart Farming
Winter 2015

Smart Farming

As worsening droughts become the new norm, soil conservationists have begun to wonder whether we are on a path to repeat the horrors of the Dust Bowl years. The articles, books and websites highlighted here offer plenty of ideas about alternate paths.

BY Todd Oppenheimer