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Spring 2015

The Culinary Frontier

As the world gets hotter and drier, we have a unique opportunity: Start growing drought-friendly foods, and enjoy the ignored but luscious methods of cooking they inspire. Welcome to our examination of this sorely neglected frontier, along with explorations of several entirely different topics.

Food Shift

In an era of chronic drought, could desert crops become the new sustainable dinner?

By CHRISTOPHER D. COOK

The Clay Mystique

A gastro-scientific investigation of why cooks believe food tastes better (note: much better) when it’s cooked in a ceramic pot. Tour guide: Paula Wolfert, the legendary queen of American clay-pot cooking.

By TODD OPPENHEIMER
Photography by CLAIRE BLOOMBERG

Food by the Gallon

You drink eight glasses of water a day. But you consume far more through the food you eat. A special report.

By JESSICA CAREW KRAFT

Other Topics In This Issue

The Soul of French Invention

Woodworker and author Gary Rogowski makes the case for the Musée des Arts et Métiers as Paris’ best museum, and offers a guide to its extensive holdings.

By GARY ROGOWSKI

Parts & Recreation

What makes people devote hours to the frustrating task of gluing together pieces so small you have to pick them up with tweezers? And does this obsessive hobby even matter anymore? To find out, a devotee of the art dives into Revell’s world of plastic models.

By JEFF GREENWALD

The Hidden Wonders of the Musée des Arts et Métiers: Paris’ Museum of Art and Invention

A CRAFTSMANSHIP photo essay.

By GARY ROGOWSKI

Spoonism

“How I stumbled upon the world’s most perfect eating utensil”: Owen Edwards pays homage to the humble, essential spoon, particularly the version designed by the legendary Massimo Vignelli.

By OWEN EDWARDS
Photography by CLAIRE BLOOMBERG

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