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SPRING ISSUE 2016:

Made in America?

You see it everywhere now—in tags and marketing campaigns for everything from wallets to clothes to cars. If it’s “Made in America,” by definition it’s supposed to be good, if not superior to foreign competitors. But is it really? Many of these products require skills that virtually disappeared from the American landscape decades ago. In this issue of Craftsmanship, we examine what it takes to retrieve those skills—in a form that’s built to last. We also visit a New Yorker cartoonist, and a gang of science nerds seeking new frontiers with craft beer.

SPRING ISSUE 2016:

Made in America?

You see it everywhere now—in tags and marketing campaigns for everything from wallets to clothes to cars. If it’s “Made in America,” by definition it’s supposed to be good, if not superior to foreign competitors. But is it really? Many of these products require skills that virtually disappeared from the American landscape decades ago. In this issue of Craftsmanship, we examine what it takes to retrieve those skills—in a form that’s built to last. We also visit a New Yorker cartoonist, and a gang of science nerds seeking new frontiers with craft beer.

SPRING ISSUE 2016:

Made in America?

You see it everywhere now—in tags and marketing campaigns for everything from wallets to clothes to cars. If it’s “Made in America,” by definition it’s supposed to be good, if not superior to foreign competitors. But is it really? Many of these products require skills that virtually disappeared from the American landscape decades ago. In this issue of Craftsmanship, we examine what it takes to retrieve those skills—in a form that’s built to last. We also visit a New Yorker cartoonist, and a gang of science nerds seeking new frontiers with craft beer.

SPRING ISSUE 2016:

Made in America?

You see it everywhere now—in tags and marketing campaigns for everything from wallets to clothes to cars. If it’s “Made in America,” by definition it’s supposed to be good, if not superior to foreign competitors. But is it really? Many of these products require skills that virtually disappeared from the American landscape decades ago. In this issue of Craftsmanship, we examine what it takes to retrieve those skills—in a form that’s built to last. We also visit a New Yorker cartoonist, and a gang of science nerds seeking new frontiers with craft beer.

SPRING ISSUE 2016:

Made in America?

You see it everywhere now—in tags and marketing campaigns for everything from wallets to clothes to cars. If it’s “Made in America,” by definition it’s supposed to be good, if not superior to foreign competitors. But is it really? Many of these products require skills that virtually disappeared from the American landscape decades ago. In this issue of Craftsmanship, we examine what it takes to retrieve those skills—in a form that’s built to last. We also visit a New Yorker cartoonist, and a gang of science nerds seeking new frontiers with craft beer.

SPRING ISSUE 2016:

Made in America?

You see it everywhere now—in tags and marketing campaigns for everything from wallets to clothes to cars. If it’s “Made in America,” by definition it’s supposed to be good, if not superior to foreign competitors. But is it really? Many of these products require skills that virtually disappeared from the American landscape decades ago. In this issue of Craftsmanship, we examine what it takes to retrieve those skills—in a form that’s built to last. We also visit a New Yorker cartoonist, and a gang of science nerds seeking new frontiers with craft beer.

Other Topics in This Issue:

How Far Can Beer Science Go?
Spring 2016

How Far Can Beer Science Go?

Where else would you expect to find a band of techno-scientific beer geeks except in the industrial side of San Francisco, Ground Zero for start-ups? Join our fermentation correspondent as she travels to the outer edges of beer flavors with the boys of Method Beer.

BY Grace Rubenstein
Fun factoids, and additional resources on craft beer.
Open source document, Exhibit A: Method Brewing’s Jalapeño Imperial IPA

Other Issues: